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[TAAZA] Motorcycle by Shajie

‘Motorcycle’ feels like a breakthrough for Shajie. Everything seems to come together here in such a beautiful way, I was a little blown a way the first time I heard it. Shajie’s latest builds around a mechanical drum machine loop that cycles continually underneath a fuzzy guitar and robotic electronic blips and synths. But, as

TAAZA: ‘Dus Rupay Glass’ by Saulat Qadri

Saulat Qadri's latest track centres around the repeated phrase 'dus rupay glass' blaring from a distant juice vendor. And even though Qadri warns us with a disclaimer - 'you might find the loops monotonous' - it's quickly evident that that is the point. This 11 minute track reminded me of composer Steve Reich's famous 'Come

Frostbitten Kitten by Karachi Night

Happy Machines by Karachi Night Karachi Night, aka Yousef Qadeer, has two releases, both from 2015: 'Happy Machines' and the 4-track 'Composure' EP. With a heavy garage punk sound - maybe some Velvet Undergound influence? -  Karachi Night often anchors his tracks to a stiff bassline that remains solid and unwavering throughout. 'Frostbitten Kitten' is similar -

Surge – Sail Into Night

I came across Sail Into Night after they were featured on Beehype for their debut EP 'Passenger'. The band is UAE-based Pakistani duo of Zara (harmonium, vocals) and Nabil (guitars, vocals, drums). 'Surge', the second track from the EP, is the standout. It revolves around a single repeated lyric - 'Father mine, I don't understand' (I

Mountains in Love – Dynoman

It’s always special when Dynoman releases. His debut ‘Naubahar’ was one of the most innovative and fresh albums I’ve heard coming out of Pakistan. ‘Mountains in Love’ is the second single from ‘Travels to Janaicah: Songs for Lana’, the follow up to 2016’s ‘Travels to Janaicah: Cheebay’s Imagination’. With every subsequent release, Haamid Rahim moves

First Light – Cheeems

Cheeems is one of those chameleonic artists who seems able to do anything. In the bouncy ‘round the bend’, he takes on the stripes of chill dance music. In the stellar ‘Water’, he’s bluesier and poppier, before switching up into a sort of psych-funk breakdown. In 'Island Dawn', he’s a lo-fi bedroom singer-songwriter. But if

Sibylline – Spirare and Tipu Sabziwaar

There's a sound that pops up midway through 'Sibylline' that sounds vaguely like a mobile phone vibrating on a distant table. It's a weirdly disconcerting sound - the first time I heard it I immediately looked around for my phone - and Spirare uses it as a Trojan horse for anxious and swirling synths as